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News — Metal Statue

Gods, Musicians and the Bizarre - Bronze Sculptures of India

Bronze Sculpture Metal Statue Products

Gods, Musicians and the Bizarre - Bronze Sculptures of India

Indian artisans have been casting brass and bronze sculptures for thousands of years. A quick tour of some of the unusual, and sometimes very strange, brass and bronze sculptures from different aspects of India on sale at the Silk Road Gallery.

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Indian Sculpture - What is the lost Wax Process?

Brass statues Buddha Statues Ganesh Sculptures Ganesh Statues Indian Sculpture Krishna Statue Metal Statue Mustang Products

Indian Sculpture - What is the lost Wax Process?

Many Indian Statues are made by the lost wax process in which a wax sculpture of an image is covered in clay which is then baked. The wax melts away leaving a negative image of the sculpture inside the hardened clay. Molten metal is then poured into the mould. 

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Butter Lamps and Oil Lamps

Buddha Statues Metal Statue Products Travel Diary

Butter Lamps and Oil Lamps

Lighting the darkness You'll find oil lamps burning in Hindu and Buddhist temples throughout India, Nepal and Tibet. In these cultures fire is a symbol of transformation, for Hindus the cremation after death is a transformative process. For a Buddhist the offering of light symbolises the Buddha dispelling the darkness of ignorance. Yak butter is traditionally used in Tibet - this is what gives the monasteries their characteristic smoky, buttery smell. In Hindu temples coconut oil is used though cheaper vegetable oil seems to be used more and more in all places. Oil lamps, butter lamps are always photogenic, here...

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Krishna Statue - A Hindu deity

Krishna Krishna Statue Metal Statue Products

Krishna Statue - A Hindu deity

The Symbolism of Krishna Krishna is a Hindu deity, regarded as an avatar of Vishnu and in some monotheistic traditions considered the Supreme Being. Krishna is often depicted as an infant or young boy playing a flute as in the Bhagavata Purana. In this form, he usually stands with one leg bent in front of the other and raises a flute to his lips, accompanied by cows, emphasising his position as the divine herdsman, Govinda, or with the gopis (milkmaids). Alternatively he is represented as a youthful prince giving direction and guidance as in the Bhagavad Gita. The stories of...

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